Archive for May, 2006

Some people just do not get it…

Tuesday, May 30th, 2006

While looking for additional backup hardware, I came across an item that displayed an image that had some red text across it stating “YOU STOLE THIS IMAGE FROM XXXXXX XXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXX” (company name changed to protect the stupid). Now, anyone that has been on eBay for at least a few years has seen images that have been switched or show a hotlink warning because the seller was pointing to someone else’s image instead of their own copy.

Being the nice guy that I am, I sent a little note to the seller telling them that it appeared as if they were using a “stolen” image. Here is the email exchange (with edited headers and content):


>>>> Question from xxxxxx
>>>>>
>>>>> Item: COMPAQ / HP STORAGE SHELF xxx XXXX / XXX / XXX / XXX XX
>>>>> (xxxxxxxxxx)
>>>>> This message was sent while the listing was active.
>>>>> xxxxxx is a potential buyer.
>>>>> -------------------------------------------------------
>>>>> Might want to check the image you are using (tip: view it
>>>>> from ebay as a buyer would).
>>>> From: Jay X. Xxxxxxx [mailto:xxxxxxxx@xxxnet.com]
>>>>
>>>> Yeah, and what is the problem?

>>> From: xxxxxx
>>>
>>> Well, if you actually take a look at it, it has the following text on it: “YOU STOLE
>>> THIS IMAGE FROM MODERN COMPUTER SOLUTIONS”
>>>
>>> -Which does not exactly inspire confidence in a seller…

>> From: Jay X. Xxxxxxx [mailto:xxxxxxxx@xxxnet.com]
>>
>> Well *GENIOUS* My Seller name is *Xxxxxx Xxxxxxxx Xxxxxxxxx* This is for the idiots
>> who STEAL my images because they are too lazy to take their own pictures! Are you new
>> to eBay? I remember my first time!

> From: xxxxxx
>
> Mind yourself!
>
> Have your hosting provider implement “hotlink prevention” to help deter theft of images.
> A quick view of this eBay account will show how long it has been active (slightly longer
> than yours with this particular ID).
>
> Again, my observation was that it appears that the image used in your listing was stolen,
> not that you are trying to prevent theft. It was the only thing (up to this point, at least) that
> stopped me from taking a serious interest in the item. A semi-transparent watermark
> with “Xxxxxx Xxxxxxxx Xxxxxxxxx” would be a better way to go, IMHO.
> Take it or leave it – but save the attitude.
>
> Lastly, the word you were looking for is genius, not GENIOUS. First time speller, perhaps? 🙂

From: Jay X. Xxxxxxx [mailto:xxxxxxxx@xxxnet.com]

Well I really do not invest much time in worthless FUCKS, did I spell that right? Like you wasting my time none the less you can not afford the 10 dollar item any way. Not to mention you are blocked from buying any thing from me just on principal. And Genious was a joke; GENE-E-US enunciated you know like moron!

Well folks, that is the kind of talent you can get from Bellbrook, Ohio these days… Tip for the locals – be careful who you work with. Getting involved with amateurs like this guy will only cause problems in the long run.

Take the Advice you are Paying for

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2006

After you have been doing something well for a number of years, you begin to gain experience and wisdom regarding it. Generally, this translates to a higher salary and/or rate, as it should of course.

Companies pay this higher salary/rate because of that experience and wisdom. But it makes no sense to have that wisdom ignored by the people you work for. When that happens, it is nothing but a waste of your time, their money, and is demonstrative of complete ignorance of your experience.

And as usually the case, when other people come from a position of ignorance, they tend to inflict the problems it causes on others, instead if correcting their own problem (i.e. their ignorance) first.

The moral – if you are paying someone $167K (or more) a year, you are paying for their knowledge, experience, wisdom, and advice. Time to start getting your money’s worth – take the advice you are paying for; do not unnecessarily question it, and realize that despite your age and position, this person might know something that you do not.


Oh, and to clear it up, this is my point of view on the differences between knowledge, experience and wisdom:

  • Knowledge is what you get from schools and books, magazines, articles, training, self-study, etc. (e.g. learning C++, VB, COM and Java)
  • Experience is gain you get by applying that knowledge in real-life situations (e.g. using C++, VB and Java to solve particular problems)
  • Wisdom is what is learned from the results of the experience (e.g. learning when to use C++ over Java, Java over VB, and what things should and should not be a COM object, etc.)